ISIS, AMERICANS TURNED ISLAMIC & ANY MUSLIM IN THIS WORLD MUST DIE

SO SAY I

All Journalists know the risks they take when they go to places where Muslims live

ISIS was not ISIS when they captured Foley but they tortured him and gave him false hope that he would survive

Then they put him in an orange jumpsuit and cut off his head in the middle of a desert.

Isis is just as bad as Ebola – both must be destroyed.

Islam = Muslims = religion – a jihad which is what Islamic call a HOLY WAR

They call everyone NOT like them “infidels”

I call these inhuman fuck faces “animals”

they are black, they are white and they turn on each other

They are terrorists in black and white

These Islamic terrorists must die.

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Photo

The father of Jejoen Bontinck, a young Belgian who spent three weeks in the same cell as James Foley and other hostages, showed a picture of the prison where they were held.CreditJasper Juinen for The New York Times
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The hostages were taken out of their cell one by one.

In a private room, their captors asked each of them three intimate questions, a standard technique used to obtain proof that a prisoner is still alive in a kidnapping negotiation.

James Foley returned to the cell he shared with nearly two dozen other Western hostages and collapsed in tears of joy. The questions his kidnappers had asked were so personal (“Who cried at your brother’s wedding?” “Who was the captain of your high school soccer team?”) that he knew they were finally in touch with his family.

It was December 2013, and more than a year had passed since Mr. Foley vanished on a road in northern Syria. Finally, his worried parents would know he was alive, he told his fellow captives. His government, he believed, would soon negotiate his release.

What appeared to be a turning point was in fact the start of a downward spiral for Mr. Foley, a 40-year-old journalist, that ended in August when he was forced to his knees somewhere in the bald hills of Syria and beheaded as a camera rolled.

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GRAPHIC

The Fate of 23 Hostages in Syria

At least 23 foreign hostages from 12 countries have been kidnapped by Syrian insurgents, sold or handed over to the Islamic State, and held underground in a prison near the Syrian city of Raqqa.

OPEN GRAPHIC

His videotaped death was a very public end to a hidden ordeal.

The story of what happened in the Islamic State’s underground network of prisons in Syria is one of excruciating suffering. Mr. Foley and his fellow hostages were routinely beaten and subjected to waterboarding. For months, they were starved and threatened with execution by one group of fighters, only to be handed off to another group that brought them sweets and contemplated freeing them. The prisoners banded together, playing games to pass the endless hours, but as conditions grew more desperate, they turned on one another. Some, including Mr. Foley, sought comfort in the faith of their captors, embracing Islam and taking Muslim names.

Their captivity coincided with the rise of the group that came to be known as the Islamic State out of the chaos of the Syrian civil war. It did not exist on the day Mr. Foley was abducted, but it slowly grew to become the most powerful and feared rebel movement in the region. By the second year of Mr. Foley’s imprisonment, the group had amassed close to two dozen hostages and devised a strategy to trade them for cash.

It was at that point that the hostages’ journeys, which had been largely similar up to then, diverged based on actions taken thousands of miles away: in Washington and Paris, in Madrid, Rome and beyond. Mr. Foley was one of at least 23 Western hostages from 12 countries, a majority of them citizens of European nations whose governments have a history of paying ransoms.

Their struggle for survival, which is being told now for the first time, was pieced together through interviews with five former hostages, locals who witnessed their treatment, relatives and colleagues of the captives, and a tight circle of advisers who made trips to the region to try to win their release. Crucial details were confirmed by a former member of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, who was initially stationed in the prison where Mr. Foley was held, and who provided previously unknown details of his captivity.

The ordeal has remained largely secret because the militants warned the hostages’ families not to go to the news media, threatening to kill their loved ones if they did. The New York Times is naming only those already identified publicly by the Islamic State, which began naming them in August.

Officials in the United States say they did everything in their power to save Mr. Foley and the others, including carrying out a failed rescue operation. They argue that the United States’ policy of not paying ransoms saves Americans’ lives in the long run by making them less attractive targets.

Inside their concrete box, the hostages did not know what their families or governments were doing on their behalf. They slowly pieced it together using the only information they had: their interactions with their guards and with one another. Mostly they suffered, waiting for any sign that they might escape with their lives.

The Grab

It was only a 40-minute drive to the Turkish border, but Mr. Foley decided to make one last stop.

In Binesh, Syria, two years ago, Mr. Foley and his traveling companion, the British photojournalist John Cantlie, pulled into an Internet cafe to file their work. The two were no strangers to the perils of reporting in Syria. Only a few months earlier, Mr. Cantlie had been kidnapped a few dozen miles from Binesh. He had tried to escape, barefoot and handcuffed, running for his life as bullets kicked up the dirt, only to be caught again. He was released a week later after moderate rebels intervened.

They were uploading their images when a man walked in.

“He had a big beard,” said Mustafa Ali, their Syrian translator, who was with them and recounted their final hours together. “He didn’t smile or say anything. And he looked at us with evil eyes.”

The man “went to the computer and sat for one minute only, and then left directly,” Mr. Ali said. “He wasn’t Syrian. He looked like he was from the Gulf.”

Mr. Foley, an American freelance journalist filing for GlobalPost and Agence France-Presse, and Mr. Cantlie, a photographer for British newspapers, continued transmitting their footage, according to Mr. Ali, whose account was confirmed by emails the journalists sent from the cafe to a colleague waiting for them in Turkey.

Photo

James Foley edited video from Aleppo, Syria, two weeks before he was kidnapped in November 2012.CreditNicole Tung

More than an hour later, they flagged a taxi for the 25-mile drive to Turkey. They never reached the border.

The gunmen who sped up behind their taxi did not call themselves the Islamic State because the group did not yet exist on Nov. 22, 2012, the day the two men were grabbed.

But the danger of Islamic extremism was already palpable in Syria’s rebel-held territories, and some news organizations were starting to pull back. Among the red flags was the growing number of foreign fighters flooding into Syria, dreaming of establishing a “caliphate.” These jihadists, many of them veterans of Al Qaeda’s branch in Iraq, looked and behaved differently from the moderate rebels. They wore their beards long. And they spoke with foreign accents, coming from the Persian Gulf, North Africa, Europe and beyond.

A van sped up on the left side of the taxi and cut it off. Masked fighters jumped out. They screamed in foreign-accented Arabic, telling the journalists to lie on the pavement. They handcuffed them and threw them into the van.

They left Mr. Ali on the side of the road. “If you follow us, we’ll kill you,” they told him.

Over the next 14 months, at least 23 foreigners, most of them freelance journalists and aid workers, would fall into a similar trap. The attackers identified the locals whom journalists hired to help them, like Mr. Ali and Yosef Abobaker, a Syrian translator. It was Mr. Abobaker who drove Steven J. Sotloff, an American freelance journalist, into Syria on Aug. 4, 2013.

“We were driving for only 20 minutes when I saw three cars stopped on the road ahead,” he said. “They must have had a spy on the border that saw my car and told them I was coming.”

The kidnappings, which were carried out by different groups of fighters jousting for influence and territory in Syria, became more frequent. In June 2013, four French journalists were abducted. In September, the militants grabbed three Spanish journalists.

Checkpoints became human nets, and last October, insurgents waited at one for Peter Kassig, 25, an emergency medical technician from Indianapolis who was delivering medical supplies. In December, Alan Henning, a British taxi driver, disappeared at another. Mr. Henning had cashed in his savings to buy a used ambulance, hoping to join an aid caravan to Syria. He was kidnapped 30 minutes after crossing into the country.

The last to vanish were five aid workers from Doctors Without Borders, who were plucked in January from the field hospital in rural Syria where they had been working.

The Interrogation

At gunpoint, Mr. Sotloff and Mr. Abobaker were driven to a textile factory in a village outside Aleppo, Syria, where they were placed in separate cells. Mr. Abobaker, who was freed two weeks later, heard their captors take Mr. Sotloff into an adjoining room. Then he heard the Arabic-speaking interrogator say in English: “Password.”

It was a process to be repeated with several other hostages. The kidnappers seized their laptops, cellphones and cameras and demanded the passwords to their accounts. They scanned their Facebook timelines, their Skype chats, their image archives and their emails, looking for evidence of collusion with Western spy agencies and militaries.

“They took me to a building that was specifically for the interrogation,” said Marcin Suder, a 37-year-old Polish photojournalist kidnapped in July 2013 in Saraqib, Syria, where the jihadists were known to be operating. He was passed among several groups before managing to escape four months later.

“They checked my camera,” Mr. Suder said. “They checked my tablet. Then they undressed me completely. I was naked. They looked to see if there was a GPS chip under my skin or in my clothes. Then they started beating me. They Googled ‘Marcin Suder and C.I.A.,’ ‘Marcin Suder and K.G.B.’ They accused me of being a spy.”

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YOUR COMMENTS

Share your reactions or ask a question about this story. The reporter, Rukmini Callimachi, will respond to selected questions in the coming days.

RESPOND

Mr. Suder — who was never told the name of the group holding him, and who never met the other hostages because he escaped before they were transferred to the same location — remarked on the typically English vocabulary his interrogators had used.

During one session, they kept telling him he had been “naughty” — a word that hostages who were held with Mr. Foley also recalled their guards’ using during the most brutal torture.

It was in the course of these interrogations that the jihadists found images of American military personnel on Mr. Foley’s laptop, taken during his assignments in Afghanistan and Iraq.

“In the archive of photographs he had personally taken, there were images glorifying the American crusaders,” they wrote in an article published after Mr. Foley’s death. “Alas for James, this archive was with him at the time of his arrest.”

A British hostage, David Cawthorne Haines, was forced to acknowledge his military background: It was listed on his LinkedIn profile.

The militants also discovered that Mr. Kassig, the aid worker from Indiana, was a former Army Ranger and a veteran of the Iraq war. Both facts are easy to find online, because CNN featured Mr. Kassig’s humanitarian work prominently before his capture.

The punishment for any perceived offense was torture.

“You could see the scars on his ankles,” Jejoen Bontinck, 19, of Belgium, a teenage convert to Islam who spent three weeks in the summer of 2013 in the same cell as Mr. Foley, said of him. “He told me how they had chained his feet to a bar and then hung the bar so that he was upside down from the ceiling. Then they left him there.”

Mr. Bontinck, who was released late last year, spoke about his experiences for the first time for this article in his hometown, Antwerp, where he is one of 46 Belgian youths on trial on charges of belonging to a terrorist organization.

At first, the abuse did not appear to have a larger purpose. Nor did the jihadists seem to have a plan for their growing number of hostages.

Mr. Bontinck said Mr. Foley and Mr. Cantlie had first been held by the Nusra Front, a Qaeda affiliate. Their guards, an English-speaking trio whom they nicknamed “the Beatles,” seemed to take pleasure in brutalizing them.

Later, they were handed over to a group called the Mujahedeen Shura Council, led by French speakers.

Mr. Foley and Mr. Cantlie were moved at least three times before being transferred to a prison underneath the Children’s Hospital of Aleppo.

It was in this building that Mr. Bontinck, then only 18, met Mr. Foley. At first, Mr. Bontinck was a fighter, one of thousands of young Europeansdrawn to the promise of jihad. He later ran afoul of the group when he received a text message from his worried father back in Belgium and his commander accused him of being a spy.

The militants dragged him into a basement room with pale brown walls. Inside were two very thin, bearded foreigners: Mr. Foley and Mr. Cantlie.

Photo

RIP James

A still image from a video, released in August, in which a militant from the group that calls itself the Islamic State beheaded James Foley.

For the next three weeks, when the call to prayer sounded, all three stood.

An American Named Hamza

Mr. Foley converted to Islam soon after his capture and adopted the name Abu Hamza, Mr. Bontinck said. (His conversion was confirmed by three other recently released hostages, as well as by his former employer.)

“I recited the Quran with him,” Mr. Bontinck said. “Most people would say, ‘Let’s convert so that we can get better treatment.’ But in his case, I think it was sincere.”

Former hostages said that a majority of the Western prisoners had converted during their difficult captivity. Among them was Mr. Kassig, who adopted the name Abdul-Rahman, according to his family, who learned of his conversion in a letter smuggled out of the prison.

Only a handful of the hostages stayed true to their own faiths, including Mr. Sotloff, then 30, a practicing Jew. On Yom Kippur, he told his guards he was not feeling well and refused his food so he could secretly observe the traditional fast, a witness said.

Those recently released said that most of the foreigners had converted under duress, but that Mr. Foley had been captivated by Islam. When the guards brought an English version of the Quran, those who were just pretending to be Muslims paged through it, one former hostage said. Mr. Foley spent hours engrossed in the text.

His first set of guards, from the Nusra Front, viewed his professed Islamic faith with suspicion. But the second group holding him seemed moved by it. For an extended period, the abuse stopped. Unlike the Syrian prisoners, who were chained to radiators, Mr. Foley and Mr. Cantlie were able to move freely inside their cell.

Mr. Bontinck had a chance to ask the prison’s emir, a Dutch citizen, whether the militants had asked for a ransom for the foreigners. He said they had not.

“He explained there was a Plan A and a Plan B,” Mr. Bontinck said. The journalists would be put under house arrest, or they would be conscripted into a jihadist training camp. Both possibilities suggested that the group was planning to release them.

One day, their guards brought them a gift of chocolates.

When Mr. Bontinck was released, he jotted down the phone number of Mr. Foley’s parents and promised to call them. They made plans to meet again.

He left thinking that the journalists, like him, would soon be freed.

A Terrorist State

The Syrian civil war, previously dominated by secular rebels and a handful of rival jihadist groups, was shifting decisively, and the new extremist grouphad taken a dominant position. Sometime last year, the battalion in the Aleppo hospital pledged allegiance to what was then called the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

Photo

After Mr. Foley, the militants beheaded, from left, Alan Henning, a British taxi driver; Steven J. Sotloff (in the black helmet), an American journalist; and David Cawthorne Haines, a British aid worker.CreditLeft, via Associated Press; center, Etienne de Malglaive, via Getty Images; right, Danny Lawson/PA Wire

Other factions of fighters joined forces with the group, whose tactics were so extreme that even Al Qaeda expelled it from its terror network. Its ambitions went far beyond toppling Bashar al-Assad, Syria’s president.

Late last year, the jihadists began pooling their prisoners, bringing them to the same location underneath the hospital. By January, there were at least 19 men in one 20-square-meter cell (about 215 square feet) and four women in an adjoining one. All but one of them were European or North American. The relative freedom that Mr. Foley and Mr. Cantlie had enjoyed came to an abrupt end. Each prisoner was now handcuffed to another.

More worrying was the fact that their French-speaking guards were replaced by English-speaking ones. Mr. Foley recognized them with dread.

They were the ones who had called him “naughty” during the worst torture. They were the ones the hostages called the Beatles. They instituted a strict security protocol.

When they approached the cell holding Mr. Suder, the Polish photojournalist, they called out “arba’een”: Arabic for the number 40.

That was his cue to face the wall so that when the guards entered, he would not see their faces. Several hostages were given numbers in Arabic, which appeared to be an effort to catalog them — not unlike the numbers American forces had assigned to prisoners in the detention facilities they ran in Iraq, including Camp Bucca, where Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State, was briefly held.

“When the Beatles took over, they wanted to bring a certain level of order to the hostages,” said one recently freed European captive.

The jihadists had gone from obscurity to running what they called a state.

In areas under their control, they established an intricate bureaucracy, including a tribunal, a police force and even a consumer protection office, which forced kebab stands to close for selling low-quality products.

That focus on order extended to the hostages.

After months of holding them without making any demands, the jihadists suddenly devised a plan to ransom them. Starting last November, each prisoner was told to hand over the email address of a relative. Mr. Foley gave the address of his younger brother.

The group sent a blitz of messages to the families of the hostages.

Those who were able to lay the emails side by side could see they had been cut and pasted from the same template.

Triage

By December, the militants had exchanged several emails with Mr. Foley’s family, as well as with the families of other hostages.

Photo

The militants continue to hold three hostages, including John Cantlie, left, a British photojournalist, and Peter Kassig, right, an emergency medical technician from Indiana. They say they will kill Mr. Kassig next.

After the first proof-of-life questions, Mr. Foley was hopeful that he would be home soon. As his second Christmas away from home approached, he threw himself into organizing a jailhouse version of Secret Santa, a tradition in the Foley household.

Each prisoner gave another a gift fashioned out of trash. Mr. Foley’s Secret Santa gave him a circle made from the wax of a discarded candle to cushion his forehead when he bowed down to pray on the hard floor.

As the weeks passed, Mr. Foley noticed that his European cellmates were invited outside again and again to answer questions. He was not. Nor were the other Americans, or the Britons.

Soon, the prisoners realized that their kidnappers had identified which nations were most likely to pay ransoms, said a former hostage, one of five who spoke about their imprisonment in the Islamic State’s network of jails on the condition that their names be withheld.

“The kidnappers knew which countries would be the most amenable to their demands, and they created an order based on the ease with which they thought they could negotiate,” one said. “They started with the Spanish.”

One day, the guards came in and pointed to the three Spanish captives. They said they knew the Spanish government had paid six million euros for a group of aid workers kidnapped by a Qaeda cell in Mauritania, a figure available online in articles about the episode.

As the negotiations for the Spanish prisoners progressed rapidly — the first was released this March, six months after he had been captured — the militants moved on to the four French journalists.

The European prisoners went from answering additional personal questions to filming videos to be sent to their families or governments. The videos became more and more charged, eventually including death threats and execution deadlines in an effort to force their nations to pay.

At one point, their jailers arrived with a collection of orange jumpsuits.

In a video, they lined up the French hostages in their brightly colored uniforms, mimicking those worn by prisoners at the United States’ facility in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

They also began waterboarding a select few, just as C.I.A. interrogators had treated Muslim prisoners at so-called black sites during the George W. Bush administration, former hostages and witnesses said.

With time, the 23 prisoners were divided into two groups. The three American men and the three British hostages were singled out for the worst abuse, both because of the militants’ grievances against their countries and because their governments would not negotiate, according to several people with intimate knowledge of the events.

“It’s part of the DNA of this group to hate America,” one said. “But they also realized that the United States and Britain were the least likely to pay.”

Within this subset, the person who suffered the cruelest treatment, the former hostages said, was Mr. Foley. In addition to receiving prolonged beatings, he underwent mock executions and was repeatedly waterboarded.

Meant to simulate drowning, the procedure can cause the victim to pass out. When one of the prisoners was hauled out, the others were relieved if he came back bloodied.

Photo

Nearly two dozen Western hostages held together in a 215-square-foot cell in Syria made a chess set from discarded pieces of paper.CreditGlenna Gordon for The New York Times

“It was when there was no blood,” a former cellmate said, “that we knew he had suffered something even worse.”

As the negotiations dragged on, conditions became increasingly grim.

During one extended stretch, the hostages received the equivalent of a teacup of food per day.

They spent weeks in darkness. In one basement, their only illumination was the finger of sunlight that stretched under their locked door. After dusk, they could not see anything, spilling food on themselves until their guards eventually gave them a flashlight.

Most of the locations had no mattresses and few blankets. Some of the prisoners took discarded pants, tied one end and filled the trouser legs with rags to create makeshift pillows.

The prisoners turned on one another. Fights broke out.

Mr. Foley shared his meager rations. In the cold of the Syrian winter, he offered another prisoner his only blanket.

He kept the others entertained, proposing games and activities like Risk, a board game that involves moving imaginary armies across a map: another favorite pastime in the Foley family. The hostages made a chess set out of discarded paper. They re-enacted movies, retelling them scene by scene. And they arranged for members of the group to give lectures on topics they knew well.

Execution Deadlines

This spring, the hostages were moved from below the hospital in Aleppo to Raqqa, the capital of the Islamic State’s self-declared caliphate. They were incarcerated in a building outside an oil installation, where they were again divided by sex.

By March, the militants had concluded the negotiations for the three Spanish journalists.

When the first deliveries of cash arrived, the guards discovered that some of the bills were damaged. They complained to the remaining hostages that their governments did not even have the decency to send crisp notes.

By April, nearly half of the captives had been freed. There had been no progress, however, on the ransom demands the jihadists had made for their American and British hostages.

During the triage phase, the guards identified the single Russian hostage, a man known to the others as Sergey, as the least marketable commodity.

Identified in the Russian news media as Sergey Gorbunov, he was last seen in a video released in October 2013. Stuttering, he said that if Moscow failed to meet the kidnappers’ demands, he would be killed.

Photo

Many European hostages were released after their countries paid ransoms. Among them were Javier Espinosa of Spain, left, reunited with his son; and Edouard Elias, Didier François, Nicolas Hénin and Pierre Torres of France, center. Jejoen Bontinck of Belgium, right, joined the Islamic State but later ran afoul of the group.CreditLeft, Paco Campos/Reuters; center, Gonzalo Fuentes, Reuters; right, Virginia Mayo/Associated Press

Sometime this spring, the masked men came for him.

They dragged the terrified prisoner outside and shot him. They filmed his body. Then they returned to show the footage to the surviving hostages.

“This,” they said, “is what will happen to you if your government doesn’t pay.”

Goodbyes

Mr. Foley watched as his cellmates were released in roughly two-week increments.

As the number of people in the 20-square-meter cell in Raqqa grew smaller, it was hard to stay hopeful. Yet Mr. Foley, who had campaigned for President Obama, continued to believe his government would come to his rescue, said his family, who learned this from recently freed hostages.

On May 27, the few remaining hostages were reminded that different passports spelled different fates.

Those who had been taken together were, in most cases, released together. Not so for the Italian and British aid workers for the Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development, a small French organization, who were grabbed less than a mile from the Turkish border after returning from a refugee camp where they had gone to deliver tents.

In late May, the Italian, Federico Motka, was told he could go, according to a fellow captive, allegedly after Italy paid a ransom. (The Italian government denied the claim.) But his co-worker, Mr. Haines, was left chained inside. Mr. Haines was beheaded in September after being forced to read a script blaming the British government for his death.

By June, the cellblock that had once held at least 23 people had been reduced to just seven. Four of them were Americans, and three were British — all citizens of countries whose governments had refused to pay ransoms.

In an article recently published in an official Islamic State magazine, the jihadists described the American-led airstrikes that began in August as the nail in those hostages’ coffins.

At the same time, they laid out the role European and American ransom policies had played in their decision to kill Mr. Foley.

“As the American government was dragging its feet, reluctant to save James’s life,” they wrote in the magazine, Dabiq, “negotiations were made by the governments of a number of European prisoners, which resulted in the release of a dozen of their prisoners after the demands of the Islamic State were met.”

Fifteen hostages were freed from March to June for ransoms averaging more than two million euros, the former captives and those close to them said.

Among the last to go was a Danish photojournalist, Daniel Rye Ottosen, 25, released in June after his family cobbled together a multimillion-euro ransom, three people briefed on the negotiation said. He was one of several departing hostages who managed to smuggle out letters from his cellmates.

“I am obviously pretty scared to die,” Mr. Kassig wrote in a letter recently published by his family. “The hardest part is not knowing — hoping, and wondering if I should even hope at all.”

Mr. Foley seemed to sense the end was near. In his letter, amid expressions of love, he slipped in a sentence instructing his family on how to disburse the money in his bank account.

In August, when the militants came for him, they made him slip on a pair of plastic sandals. They drove him to a bare hill outside Raqqa. They made him kneel. He looked straight into the camera, his expression defiant. Then they slit his throat.

Two weeks later, a similar video surfaced on YouTube showing Mr. Sotloff’s death. In September, the militants uploaded Mr. Haines’s execution. In October, they killed Mr. Henning. Only three from the original group of 23 remain: two Americans, Mr. Kassig and a woman who has not been identified, as well as a Briton, Mr. Cantlie.

The militants have announced they will kill Mr. Kassig next.

Across Europe, those who had survived gasped when they saw the footage of their cellmate’s death: The cheap, beige-colored plastic flip-flops splayed next to Mr. Foley’s body were the same pair the prisoners had shared.

They had all worn those sandals to the bathroom.

Those who survived had walked in the same shoes as those who did not.

Correction: October 25, 2014
An earlier version of a picture caption with this article misspelled the given name of a British aid worker who was beheaded. He is David Cawthorne Haines, not Davis Cawthorne Haines.

EBOLA NURSE QUARANTINED IN DALLAS IS BITCHING ABOUT HER TREATMENT? BOYCOTT DOCTOR’S WITHOUT BORDERS-I’M NOT GIVING THEM ANY MORE $$$

Seriously people

If you are a health care worker

Who went to Africa to help patients with Doctor’s without Borders or any other non profit aid organization

and you are exposed to the Ebola virus you HAVE to EXPECT you’ll be quarantined

You made the choice to go there so why do any other people have to die for your choice?

NY & NJ Governor’s (as much as I despise both of these guys) did the right thing by making it mandatory hold for 24 hours

To see if these people coming out of that continent are sick

WTF? Really these people are being allowed to come back to America – some nerve they get pissed off that they are being treated unfairly!

Ebola came here much like the Summer TV Show THE STAIN only these assholes are not vampires they are black people and the white people who took care of them

To get her nose out of joint over this is unreasonable.

Just shut up Nurse Crackett, take your meds and when you are not contagious they will let you leave.

If America really wanted to be mean AND I WOULD LOVE IT IF THIS HAPPENED

JUST SEND ALL THOSE PEOPLE COMING HERE SICK WITH EBOLA BACK TO THE SHITHOLES THEY WENT TO WORK IN

 

 

 

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We are taking you back in – be grateful – but no big mouthed assholes got balk – if you don’t like it go back to Liberian shit hole you got sick in and die there.

To Organization: DOCTOR’S WITHOUT BORDERS – if you’re so concerned about the treatment of your healthcare workers don’t allow them to come back home to America sick with Ebola.

It’s astonishing the arrogance of these Doctors and their nurses. Let them rot. They don’t take care of patients here for free like they did over there in Africa. Of course NOT in America you have to pay through the nose to see a doctor.  Screw them. I’m not giving them another cent.

Nurse Under Ebola Quarantine Criticizes Her Treatment

Posted: 10/25/2014 4:11 pm EDT Updated: 1 hour ago

Kaci Hickox, the first nurse to be quarantined under a strict new policy on her return from treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, criticized her treatment in a Dallas Morning News op-ed on Saturday.

Her words echoed concerns voiced by medical professionals that a mandatory 21-day quarantine for doctors and nurses who have treated Ebola patients would deter volunteers from signing on to fight the epidemic.

“I am scared about how health care workers will be treated at airports when they declare that they have been fighting Ebola in West Africa,” Hickox wrote. “I am scared that, like me, they will arrive and see a frenzy of disorganization, fear and, most frightening, quarantine.”

On Friday, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie announced that they will require a 21-day quarantine for travelers arriving at airports in either state who have had contact with Ebola victims in West Africa. Their decision came a day after Craig Spencer, a Doctors Without Borders physician who had recently returned to New York from Guinea, tested positive for Ebola. Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn soon followed suit with a mandatory quarantine in his state.

Hickox arrived at Newark Liberty International airport on Friday and was ushered into a quarantine office, where she was kept for six hours, according to her account.

She said she was treated with hostility and was not given an explanation of what was happening or when she might be able to leave:

One after another, people asked me questions. Some introduced themselves, some didn’t. One man who must have been an immigration officer because he was wearing a weapon belt that I could see protruding from his white coveralls barked questions at me as if I was a criminal.

Two other officials asked about my work in Sierra Leone. One of them was from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They scribbled notes in the margins of their form, a form that appeared to be inadequate for the many details they are collecting.

I was tired, hungry and confused, but I tried to remain calm. My temperature was taken using a forehead scanner and it read a temperature of 98. I was feeling physically healthy but emotionally exhausted.

Three hours passed. No one seemed to be in charge. No one would tell me what was going on or what would happen to me.

I called my family to let them know that I was OK. I was hungry and thirsty and asked for something to eat and drink. I was given a granola bar and some water. I wondered what I had done wrong. (here’s my answer stupid. you went to a foreign country to take care of sick pple who live in garbage like animals who contaminated each other by pissing and shitting all over each other and you caught what they had. Then you come back to America, a place where we also have poor black people living in shit and squalor but you think you’re noble because you went to Africa to take care of the real black people? Shut the fuck and sit in your quarentine for 21 days and get better. It was your fucking choice to go to Africa instead of trying to help people in your own country. No in America the poor have to take inferior Doctor’s and Hostile nurses especially if they are on high narcotics for pain or are on medicaid, medicare or welfare. American poor cannot be cared for doctors in their own country. I hope you die from Ebola you ungrateful witch. Thomas Duncan died in Texas and he could have infected all of these people on the plane with him and so could you have. I’m appalled that you are pissed off. stfu! ) Bonju Patten

 

downloadget well soon ingrate.

 

After a subsequent forehead scan registered her temperature at 101 (a result, she wrote, of being flushed and “upset at being held with no explanation”), Hickox was put into quarantine at Newark University Hospital. Though Hickox tested negative for Ebola, she is still going to be held under a 21-day quarantine.

Public health experts have said that mandatory quarantines for people who may have been exposed to Ebola are not medically necessary, since a person does not become contagious until they exhibit symptoms of the disease.

UPDATE [ 11:15 p.m. ET]: Doctors Without Borders has issued a press release expressing concern over Hickox’s treatment, saying the organization is “very concerned about the conditions and uncertainty she is facing and is attempting to obtain information from hospital officials.” The statement continues:

While measures to protect public health are of paramount importance, they must be balanced against the rights of health workers returning from fighting the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to fair and reasonable treatment and the full disclosure of information to them, along with information about intended courses of action from local and state health authorities.

 

EBOLA HITS NYC & THEY SAY THEY GOT IT CONTAINED?

I USED TO WORK IN MANHATTAN

I’M NOT GOING THERE NOW

I AM NOT AFRAID OF EBOLA

BUT I KNOW IT’S GOING TO BE SOMETHING WE WILL FEAR MORE THAN

ISIS

MORE THAN

ANYTHING

ALL THE MEDICAL PHARMS ARE COMBINING TO FIND A CURE FOR EBOLA

IT’S NOT JUST A BLACK DISEASE – IT’S A HUMAN ABNORMALITY

LET US NOT LOSE SIGHT OF WHAT AND WHO WE ARE ALL – CUT US AND WE BLEED RED

WE ARE ALL HUMAN

==========================================================================>

 

FIRST THE TERRIBLE – HERE GOES HONEY BOO BOO!? TAKE IT OFF PLEASE – SHIT!

MAMA JUNE IS A TON OF A WOMAN

WITH A DOUBLE CHIN DOWN TO HER PUSSY

SHE IS, IN ONE WORD, GROSS

SHE IS, IN ANOTHER WORDS, WHITE FUCKING TRASH

AND THE MOTHER OF THE STAR AND UPCOMING TRAILER PARK CRAP – THE AFOREMENTIONED REALITY TV PRINCESS – HOG POS

HONEY BOO BOO

YOU MAY THINK ME HARSH SAYING THAT OF A CHILD?

COMING OFF ANOTHER SHOW “TODDLERS & TIARA’S” CABLE TV IS TOTALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR PUTTING THIS KIND OF REALITY

TV TRASH ON YOUR BOOB TUBE

BUT YOU, THE VIEWERS, ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR WATCHING

STOP WATCHING THIS SHIT

Watching this show and this insane pos family does not make your life better – it makes you look like a sick fuck and I’m not talking about the rock group either. (rolling my eyes)

Now, Mama June, the moose from hell, is divorcing her new husband and long time lover (and NO that does not slip off my tongue easily) Sugar Bear (I swear I can’t believe I’m writing this) to fall into step with a new man in her life, a 53 year old sex offender who pedophiled one of the children in her family (extended or otherwise. these a holes aren’t saying who this asshole hurt) and he looks like he’s a mascara wearing weirdo.

This is the best she can do and NOW, after all this, TLC the cable channel that brings HERE COMES THE WHITE TRASH family into your WHITE TRASH HOMES every week is now uncertain how to proceed with this “reality TV show” and is considering yanking it off the air.

PLEASE YANK IT OFF THE AIR – IT’S SHIT

THIS IS HONESTLY WORSE THAN WATCHING THE KARDASHIANS

BY THE WAY, I JUST VOTED THE “PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARDS” AND THE WORLD HAS TURNED AGAINST “GOD” – YEEZUS WAS NOT EVEN A MENTION – Kayne West is south.

========================================================================================)

HOW SAD IS YOUR LIFE IF YOU THINK THIS SHOW IS FUN TO WATCH?

STRAIGHT OFF TMZ – ANOTHER CRAP RAG AND TV SHOW

Mama June

Dating Man Who Molested Her Relative

10/23/2014 1:00 AM PDT BY TMZ STAFF
EXCLUSIVE

Mama June BoyfriendMama June is seeing someone new, but there’s a big problem … the guy just got out of prison after serving time for molesting one of June’s relatives … TMZ has learned.

The new guy is 53-year-old Mark McDaniel. He was convicted in 2004 for aggravated child molestation. Prosecutors say he molested an 8-year-old child — forcing oral sex. June was dating McDaniel at the same time he molested the child.

We will not identify the child but it’s someone with whom June has contact.

1022_Mark-McDaniel_mug

McDaniel served 10 years and was released this past March. He is now a registered sex offender in the state of Georgia.

We’re told Honey Boo Boo’s mom has been seeing McDaniel for the last few months … sneaking away from production of the show and meeting up with him. We’re told she’s also been setting him up by buying him various gifts.

The photo was taken a few weeks ago in a hotel room where June, McDaniel, and other guests were hanging out.

We contacted TLC, which produces “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo.” The official says, “TLC is not currently in production on HERE COMES HONEY BOO BOO.  We are very concerned about this new information and are reassessing the future of the series.”

We reached out to June … so far no word back.

 

OUR WORLD IS DEAD AND GONE TO THE ZOMBIES IF THIS SHIT IS STAYING ON TV – FAMILY VALUES MY ASS – GET BACK INTO THE WOODS YOU PERVERTS!

0919_mama_june_sugar_bear_split_footer_2

Read more: http://www.tmz.com/2014/10/23/mama-june-boyfriend-dating-mark-mcdaniel-molested-child/#ixzz3H2AQdP2U

#gamergate and the men who threaten women with rape – cowards!

THERE IS ZERO DIFFERENCE B/T THESE CRAZY MEN AND THEIR CRAZY MUSLIM COUNTERPARTS IN OTHER PARTS OF THE WORLD. TWO EXTREMES ONLY CREATE A KABOOM!

Threats against Anita Sarkeesian have shined a spotlight on a harassment campaign against female game developers and critics. CreditJim Wilson/The New York Times

Anita Sarkeesian, a feminist cultural critic, has for months received death and rape threats from opponents of her recent work challenging the stereotypes of women in video games. Bomb threats for her public talks are now routine. One detractor created a game in which players can click their mouse to punch an image of her face.

Not until Tuesday, though, did Ms. Sarkeesian feel compelled to cancel a speech, planned at Utah State University. The day before, members of the university administration received an email warning that a shooting massacre would be carried out at the event. And under Utah law, she was told, the campus police could not prevent people with weapons from entering her talk.

“This will be the deadliest school shooting in American history, and I’m giving you a chance to stop it,” said the email, which bore the moniker Marc Lépine, the name of a man who killed 14 women in a mass shooting in Montreal in 1989 before taking his own life.

The threats against Ms. Sarkeesian are the most noxious example of a weekslong campaign to discredit or intimidate outspoken critics of the male-dominated gaming industry and its culture. The instigators of the campaign are allied with a broader movement that has rallied around the Twitter hashtag #GamerGate, a term adopted by those who see ethical problems among game journalists and political correctness in their coverage. The more extreme threats, though, seem to be the work of a much smaller faction and aimed at women. Major game companies have so far mostly tried to steer clear of the vitriol, leading to calls for them to intervene.

Have You Experienced Sexism in the Gaming Industry?

The New York Times would like to hear how sexism and gender issues have affected your experience with gaming.

While the online attacks on women have intensified in the last few months, the dynamics behind the harassment go back much further. They arise from larger changes in the video game business that have redefined the audience for its products, expanding it well beyond the traditional young, male demographic. They also reflect the central role games play in the identity of many fans.

“That sense of being marginalized by the rest of society, and that sense of triumph when you’re recognized,” said Raph Koster, a veteran game developer. “Gamers have had that for quite a while.”

Mr. Koster has experienced the fury that has long lurked in parts of the game community. In the late 1990s, when he was the lead designer for Ultima Online, a pioneering multiplayer web-based game, he received anonymous hate messages for making seemingly small changes in the game.

After an electrical fire at his house, someone posted a note on Mr. Koster’s personal website saying he wished the game designer had died in the blaze.

The malice directed recently at women, though, is more intense, invigorated by the anonymity of social media and bulletin boards where groups go to cheer each other on and hatch plans for action. The atmosphere has become so toxic, say female game critics and developers, that they are calling on big companies in the $70-billion-a-year video game business to break their silence.

“Game studios, developers and major publishers need to vocally speak up against the harassment of women and say this behavior is unacceptable,” Ms. Sarkeesian said in an interview.

Representatives for several major game publishers — Electronic Arts, Activision Blizzard and Take-Two Interactive Software — declined to comment.

“Threats of violence and harassment are wrong,” the Entertainment Software Association, the main lobbying group for big game companies, said in a statement. “They have to stop. There is no place in the video game community — or our society — for personal attacks and threats.”

Photo

A YouTube video series created by Ms. Sarkeesian that examines gender issues has led to death and rape threats against her.

On Wednesday, as word of the latest threat against Ms. Sarkeesian circulated online, the hashtag #StopGamerGate2014 became a trending topic on Twitter. The term #GamerGate was popularized on the social media service over the past two months after an actor, Adam Baldwin, used it to describe what he and others viewed as corruption among journalists who cover the game industry. People using the term have been criticizing popular game sites for running articles and opinion columns sympathetic to feminist critics of the industry, denouncing them as “social justice warriors.”

In a phone interview, Mr. Baldwin, who said he was not an avid gamer himself but has done voice work for the popular Halo games and others, said he did not condone the harassment of Mr. Sarkeesian and others.

“GamerGate distances itself by saying, ‘This is not what we’re about,’ ” said Mr. Baldwin. “We’re about ethics in journalism.”

While harassment of Ms. Sarkeesian and other women in the video game business has been an issue for years, it intensified in August when the former boyfriend of an independent game developer, Zoe Quinn, wrote a rambling online essay, accusing her of having a relationship with a video game journalist.

That essay, in turn, fueled threats of violence against Ms. Quinn, who had designed an unconventional game about depression, and gave fodder to those suspicious of media bias in the industry. The game review site Kotaku, which employed the journalist named in the accusation, said he had not written about her game. Ms. Quinn said that she had left her home and not returned because of harassment.

And last week an independent game developer in Boston, Brianna Wu, said she was driven from her home by threats of violence after she poked fun at supporters of #GamerGate on Twitter. “From the top down in the video game industry,” she said, “you have all these signals that say, ‘This is a space for men.’ ”

Gaming — or at least who plays video games — is quickly changing, though. According to the Electronic Software Association, 48 percent of game players in the United States are women, a figure that has grown as new opportunities to play games through mobile devices, social networks and other avenues have proliferated. Game developers, however, continue to be mostly male: In a survey conducted earlier this year by the International Game Developers Association, a nonprofit association for game developers, only 21 percent of respondents said they were female.

Still, game companies have made some progress in their depiction of women in games, said Kate Edwards, the executive director of the association, who works with companies to discourage them from employing racial and sexual stereotypes in their games. A game character she praises is the new version of Lara Croft, the heroine of the Tomb Raider series who once epitomized the exaggerated, busty stereotype of a female game protagonist. The new Lara Croft is more emotionally complex and modestly proportioned.

Ms. Edwards said changes in games and the audience around them have been difficult for some gamers to accept.

“The entire world around them has changed,” she said. “Whether they realize it or not, they’re no longer special in that way. Everyone is playing games.”

DEAR GLEN CAMPBELL – WE’RE GONNA MISS YOU! <3

HIS LAST AND NEWEST VIDEO SONG CAME OUT TODAY

I CRIED THROUGH IT

I LIKE GLEN CAMPBELL

HE WAS MY WITCHITA HERO

HE WAS MY TRUE GRIT

HE WAS A COUNTRY COONER

AND HE WAS LEGIT!

NEVER HAD TOO MANY PROBLEMS

LIVED IN THE FAST LANE

HIS MEMORY IS SLOWED

AND ALTZHEIMER’S IS KICKING IT AGAIN

YOU WILL BE MISSED MY FRIEND

UNTIL ALL OUR VERY ENDS

==================================================================>

IF THIS DOES NOT MAKE YOU BAWL OUT LOUD YOU HAVE NO HEART – I’M SITTING IN TEARS.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6J99mWFqMU   glen campbell goodbye

ILLEGAL HERE IN AMERICA DEPORTS HIMSELF TO SAVE MOTHER, SHE DIES & HE IS NOW BEING ALLOWED BACK INTO USA?

HE WAS BORN IN MEXICO

HE IS IN HARVARD (THE SCHOOL) FOR FILM -

ON WHO’S DIME?

PROB OURS

AND HE BROUGHT HIS MOM TO MEXICO TO CURE HER OF AN ILLNESS BUT SHE DIED IN MEXICO

AND THIS GUY WANTS TO COME HOME

AND OBAMA IS LETTING HIM

AND HE IS ILLEGAL.

KEEP HIM IN HIS HOME COUNTRY

THIS IS OUTRAGEOUS

HOW IS THIS ILLEGAL PIG IN HARVARD?

I FIND THIS ALL HORRIBLE

AND IF HIS MOTHER WAS DYING

WHY DIDN’T HE JUST LET HER DIE IN AMERICA?

I DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS AND I THINK HE NEEDS TO STAY IN MEXICO.

====================================================

THIS LOBO IS TAKING UP SPACE THAT ANOTHER AMERICAN COULD TAKE

WHO IS LEGAL

Harvard Student Who Took Dying Mother To Mexico Can Return To America

Posted: 10/14/2014 5:56 pm EDT Updated: 4 hours ago
DARIO GUERRERO

LOS REYES LA PAZ, Mexico (AP) — Only hours after the publication of an Associated Press story on his case Tuesday, the U.S. government issued a humanitarian visa enabling the return of a Harvard University student who broke immigration rules by taking his dying mother to Mexico.

Dario Guerrero was born in Mexico and moved with his family to California when he was 2. The Obama administration granted him and hundreds of thousands of other young immigrants a reprieve from deportation two years ago.

But these people can’t leave the U.S. without government approval. And Guerrero’s mother was dying of cancer.

 Desperate to save her, Guerrero took his mother to clinics in Mexico before getting that approval. She died there in August, and he’s been stuck since then. The government denied his initial request to return, saying he effectively deported himself by taking his mother across the border before the paperwork was done on his approval request.

Guerrero has been languishing since then at his grandparents’ home outside Mexico City, saying he’s hoping for another chance to return home to his family in California and complete his studies in Massachusetts.

Hours after the AP explained his story, he got his answer: In a two-page letter to his lawyer, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service said it has conditionally approved a 2-year parole for Guerrero, meaning he can return without fear of deportation.

“He should be back in America in a few days,” his attorney Alan Klein told the AP.

Since his mother died in August, the film studies major stayed with his grandparents in a gang-controlled suburb of Mexico City. His effort to get a exemption from the rules was a long shot: Last year, the agency approved only about a third of the humanitarian parole petitions it received.

Agency officials declined to discuss any details of Guerrero’s case because it is ongoing. However, spokesman Chris Bentley said earlier Tuesday that “immigration law is complex; anyone considering taking an immigration action needs to clearly understand the potential consequences of that action first.”

Guerrero told the AP that he had submitted two requests for fast-tracked permission to leave while his mother’s health declined at the family’s home in Long Beach, California, and was asked to more fully document his mother’s medical condition. He could have tried to plead his case in person, but he left instead before getting an answer.

“My mom had a lot of ups and downs,” he said. “The decision to actually leave was made overnight.”

Miami-based immigration attorney Ira Kurzban says it’s not infrequent for immigrants to lose their legal status by leaving the country without permission. It happens when they go on cruise ships – thinking they haven’t really left the U.S. – or take off due to a family emergency. Many discover only later that they can’t return, or are barred for entering for as much as 10 years.

“There’s no question (Guerrero) didn’t follow the rules. The question is what the penalty should be,” Kurzban said.

Any immigrants with pending cases need permission to go abroad, which is not difficult to get eventually, if their requests are deemed valid. But those who don’t wait for sometimes slow responses are considered to have voluntarily given up their effort to remain in the U.S.

Advocates say it should be easier for immigrants who have lived in the U.S. for many years to get permission to travel. Visas for skilled H-1B temporary workers already allow travel internationally without preapproval, and giving others this freedom would reduce heartbreak and add only minimal administrative work, Kurzban said.

But no such provisions were included in last year’s immigration reform bills, and they aren’t expected to be included in any executive action President Barack Obama might announce later this year. Kurzban thinks that’s because the issue affects a relatively small group, and there are so many other priorities.

When Rocio Meneses Diaz died Aug. 14 at the age of 41 in the central Mexican state of Guanajuato. Guerrero’s 16-year-old brother also was by her side. As a U.S.-born citizen, he is allowed to travel freely. Their father, a building contractor in the U.S. illegally, stayed behind with their 9-year-old sister, also a citizen.

Guerrero says he regrets his rash decision most of all because he thinks his mother would have been happier living her final days in Southern California with her husband and children, “but then we still had hope – and if we delayed that treatment any longer because of immigration issues, I don’t think I would have been able to forgive myself.”

Guerrero’s parents had kept his immigration status secret for years. They came clean only when he began taking community-college engineering classes while still in high school, and the Social Security number his parents submitted bounced back.

Before her death, Guerrero’s mom opened up about the past and her reasons for leaving Mexico: Her father had been kidnapped twice; her father-in-law and other relatives faced extortion; armed thieves broke into her clothing and jewelry store, holding a knife to her stomach.

Guerrero recorded her stories and her struggle with kidney cancer, hoping to turn it into a documentary back at school.

Instead, he has passed time in a room next to a garage just big enough to fit his twin bed and bureau. A picture of his mother and a single rose hang above the bed. His grandparents rent out the nearest bathroom during weekends for a pop-up street market. Guerrero sees his cousins after they get off work, and “writes poetry and stuff” at night.

Former Harvard lecturer Eoin Cannon, who taught history to Guerrero, was surprised to learn of his student’s predicament. Cannon described him as “one of the most thoughtful and creative and original students that I had the pleasure of teaching,” and “an exceptional writer.” Guerrero tackled homelessness in a student film, and later co-produced “A Dream Deferred,” a documentary about other immigrants like himself at Harvard.

“He’s as American as anyone I know,” Cannon said. “The law needs to sort of recognize that and have a mechanism for accounting for that … For the law not to be able to handle his kind of case is hurting America.”

Guerrero says it’s been liberating to have no term-paper deadlines to worry about, but the lack of a routine keeps him edgy. He watches his back when he ventures outside. Crime cartels have moved in, extorting neighborhood businesses. Weeks ago, a relative was mugged and shot in the stomach.

Harvard has been supportive, granting him leave and helping him find sympathetic ears in Washington, including Sen. Dick Durbin, an Illinois Democrat. But when asked what’s hardest about being stuck in Mexico, he loses his bravado and his voice drops to a whisper: “That I don’t have a mom anymore.”

 

EVEN NOTORIOUS PEDOPHILIAC PENN STATE DON’T WANT ANY SAYREVILLE NJ BOMBER SENIORS ON THEIR FOOTBALL TEAM

Apparently MYLES HARTSFIELD, senior at the NOTORIOUS SAYREVILLE, NJ has had his football scholarship pulled because he’s from that shit school who has 7 rapists on their team.

although he may have or not been involved he is NOT gonna get his scholarship even if he sues

which he probably will seeing that this feels like a railroading of sorts

but let’s face it – this school’s parents and students deserve this

7 of them hazed, bullied, and then raped freshmen football players

in their locker room over a series of days

and the SCHOOL knew about it.

The parents should be arrested along with their kids

This is only my opinion and while I don’t have a single kid

I pay plenty in Property Taxes so I expect a lot out of children in school

When I get back returns

I get pissy

=================================================================

Some morons are saying that other schools are gonna line up to sign this corner back up

But I think they are dead WRONG

This guy has the Scarlet letter on his ass because he’s a part of that school, part of that team and a senior

He is more of a pariah  now than even

MICHAEL SAM

I think this kid should bone up on his academics cause he ain’t gonna go anywhere with football.

UNLESS HE WANTS TO PLAY THE PIGSKIN.

AND, YEAH, I DO MEAN THAT LITERALLY.

AND ON TOP OF ALL THIS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS IN NJ IS THINKING OF CANCELLING BOMBER FOOTBALL FOREVER.

INSTEAD OF BEING MORTIFIED, SAYREVILLE, NJ PARENTS ARE PISSED OFF THAT THE REST OF THE TEAM HAS TO SUFFER?

IT’S TIME TO START PUTTING THESE TERRIBLE PEOPLE CALLED PARENTS IN JAIL. THEY ARE A DISGUSTING DISGRACE TO MY GENERATION AND THE GENERATION FOLLOWING – OUR CHILDREN.

==============================================================

Sayreville’s Myles Hartsfield has scholarship pulled by Penn State, according to report

By Braulio Perez | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
on October 13, 2014 11:40 a.m.

Sayreville’s Myles Hartsfield is no longer Penn State-bound.

Ryan Snyder, of Rivals’ BlueWhiteIllustrated.com, reported on Monday morning the Nittany Lions pulled Hartsfield’s scholarship offer. The 5-11, 180-poundercommitted to Penn State in June, choosing the Big Ten school over offers from Rutgers, Georgia Tech, Purdue, Wake Forest, West Virginia and several others.

On Friday night, moments before authorities announced seven juveniles were taken into custody on charges of juvenile delinquency arising from the attacks upon four victims in four separate incidents at Sayreville, police arrived at Hartsfield’s home.

The names of those taken into custody were not released.

On Saturday, Penn State assistant athletic director Jeff Nelson told NJ Advance Media that the school was going to continue to monitor the situation at Sayreville. The seven players were taken into custody two days after the daunting details were released by NJ Advanced Media of the hazing that took place in the Bombers locker room.

Hartsfield is a three-star prospect according to Rivals.com and the No. 13 prospect for the state of New Jersey. The senior was expected to play cornerback at Penn State beginning in 2015. As a junior last season, he recorded 44 tackles, seven pass break-ups and four interceptions (one returned for a touchdown). He also blocked three field goals.

Offensively, Hartsfield has starred at running back for the Bombers since he was a sophomore in 2012. Last season, he rushed for 1,586 yards and 24 touchdowns. In three games this season, Hartsfield had 582 total yards and 12 touchdowns.

“He’s a tremendous athlete with so many different skill-sets that he creates mismatches on both sides of the football,” Sayreville coach George Najjar told NJ.com’s Todderick Hunt before the start of the season. “I think his instincts are great, I think his speed and acceleration are special and he has all the gifts of a complete football player.”

In addition, Rutgers senior associate athletic director Jason Baum said the Sayreville product does not hold a Scarlet Knight offer.

“He was committed to another school and when a player commits to another program, they no longer have a commit table offer from Rutgers University,” Baum told NJ Advance Media’s Matt Stanmyre in an email on Sunday.

WICHITA WOMAN LIVES TO 100 YEARS TO GET RAPED BY A LOW DOWN 35 YR OLD NIGGER

IN THIS CASE & EVERY OTHER FUCKING CASE

A NIGGER IS ANY MAN WHO IS WHITE, BLACK, PURPLE AND WHO IS EITHER A RAPISTS, PAEDOPHILE

MURDERER

SICK?

I AM

THIS MAKES ME SICK

JUST LIKE THE NIGGER WHO RAPED THE PUPPY

WHO RAPED THE TEEN

WHO RAPED, RAPED RAPED

MEN FROM FAMILIES THAT ARE VIOLENT NEED TO BE CUT THE SECOND THEY ARE BORN

TEST THEIR FAMILIES TO SEE IF THEY COME FROM INTELLIGENT PEOPLE

IF THEY ARE LOW CLASS, WHITE OR BLACK TRASH, DOMESTIC ABUSERS, AND/OR CRAZY PEOPLE

CUT THEIR DICKS OFF AND THEY CAN PISS IN A BAG FOR THE REST OF THEIR LIVES

AND

THEY

CAN CARRY MY LUGGAGE

=================================================================>

Kasey Nesbitt Arrested In Rape Of 100-year-old Woman

Posted: 10/10/2014 4:55 pm EDT Updated: 10/10/2014 4:59 pm EDT
KASEY NESBITT
 I’D LIKE TO WIPE THIS SMIRK OFF HIS FLAPPERS WITH A KICK IN THE ASS – ALL THE WAY UP HIS BLACK ASS
PLEASE PUT THIS NIGGER IN GENERAL POP.

Police in Wichita have arrested a suspect in the rape of a 100-year-old woman during a break-in at her home.

The Wichita Eagle reports Kasey Nesbitt, 35, was being held Friday in the Sedgwick County Jail on suspicion of rape and aggravated burglary.

Jail and court records list Nesbitt as a Wichita resident with multiple convictions for burglary and theft.

The woman, who lives alone, told police she was awakened the night of Sept. 29 by two intruders. She walked to a neighbor’s house around 7:15 a.m. the next day to say people were still in her home.

Police Capt. Troy Livingston described the victim as a strong and brave woman who is being cared for by her family.

IT’S OFFICIAL THE LAST 14 YEARS HAVE BEEN THE 2ND DEPRESSION

INEQUALITY

OF THE RICH V THE POOR

MITT ROMNEY IS THINKING (always difficult) OF RUNNING FOR POTUS AGAIN

IN 2016

HE WANTS TO GET HUMILIATED BY A WOMAN NOW

AND INEQUALITY WITH PAY IS A FUCKING FACT

===============================================================================

Key Inequality Measure The Highest Since The Great Depression

Posted: 10/14/2014 11:44 am EDT Updated: 10/14/2014 11:44 am EDT

You know inequality is getting bad when it’s making a Swiss bank uncomfortable.

The ratio of wealth to household income in the U.S., a measure of inequality, is the highest it has been since just before the Great Depression, Credit Suisse noted in a 64-page report on global wealth released on Monday. The bank also warned that this was not good news for the health of the economy:

“This is a worrying signal given that abnormally high wealth income ratios have always signaled recession in the past,” the bank wrote.

Meanwhile, the richest 1 percent in the world own 48 percent of all the world’s wealth, according to Credit Suisse — a worrying signal for the global economy.

Here’s a chart from the Credit Suisse report, of wealth-to-income ratios going back to 1900:

ratio

Because wealth is a big pile of money that has been built up over the years, and income is a much smaller annual flow of new money, this ratio is always pretty high: Going back to 1900, wealth has always been at least four times as high as disposable income.

But sometimes the country’s wealth stockpile surges to even greater heights. Right before the Great Depression, there was seven times as much wealth in the country as disposable income. Right before the dot-com and housing bubbles burst, there was six times as much wealth as income.

See a pattern there? This ratio tends to get out of whack when bubbles of one sort or another have been built up, This typically ends badly, very badly.

Today the ratio is higher than at the peak of the dot-com and housing bubbles. So, yikes.

This time could always be different, of course. You could argue that there’s no bubble today that’s nearly as ridiculous and dire as the dot-com or housing bubbles. Most of the wealth build-up of recent years has been due to the stock market soaring to record highs. There is at least some justification for record-high stock prices, given thatcorporate profits are at record highs, too.

Then again, the stock market that has been inflated at least partly by historic levels ofFederal Reserve stimulus. And corporate profits are at record highs at least partly because companies are being so stingy with workers: Wages have been flat throughout the recovery and for the past few decades, really, when you adjust for inflation.

Whether we get a recession this time or not, this news is at least a sign that French economist Thomas Piketty is on to something when he warns that wealth tends to grow more quickly than income, leading to dangerous imbalances.